Embryo Adoption…

Embryo Adoption…What you Need to Know

It can be a scary topic to talk about, embryo adoption. Something about it seems to make people uncomfortable. But then again, so did the idea of open adoption just years ago. Once you educate yourself on the topic you’ll find that it’s not so scary after all. In fact, embryo adoption is the ideal family building solution for many couples and even singles.

Where Did it Originate?

Over the past couple decades; thousands of couples have been able to have children through the use of in vitro fertilization (IVF). After completing their treatment more often than not, these couples find themselves with remaining embryos in frozen storage. Couples must then face the difficult decision of determining what will become of those remaining embryos. As IVF has continued to grow in popularity there are an estimated 500,000 cyropreserved (frozen) embryos in storage in the U.S. alone. Couples may choose to donate the embryos to research or to another couple experiencing infertility.

In addition, debates remain over whether the transfer of frozen embryos should be termed an “adoption” or a “donation.” (It often correlates with one’s belief on when human life begins life). The practice of embryo donation has long been available at IVF clinics, but it wasn’t until the late 1990’s that embryo “adoption” agencies and facilitators came about.

Why?

By choosing donation for adoption, another couple has the opportunity to adopt the embryos. The embryos are given a chance to grow, to be born and loved in a family. Through embryo placement, families are also given the opportunity to experience pregnancy and birth.

We will be sharing more information about Embryo Adoption within the upcoming posts, but in the mean time, feel free to visit www.afth.org and check out our Heartbeats section or register for  a free Heartbeats webinar to learn more.

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